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The project « New Towns, Arrival Cities (NTAC) » was funded with the support of the European Union under the Programme “Europe for Citizens”

Applicable to the Strand 2 – Measure 2.2 “Networks of Towns”

Five events have been carried out within this project:

Event 1 Participation: The event involved 113 citizens, including 86 participants from the city of Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), 5 participants from the city of Sabaudia and University of Padua (Italy), 5 participants from the city of Grand Paris Sud (France), 5 participants from the KTH University (Sweden), 7 participants from the city of Nissewaard and the International New Town Institute (the Netherlands) and 5 participants from the city of Aarhus and Aarhus School of Architecture (Denmark)
Location / Dates: The event took place in Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, from 22/11/2017 to 23/11/2017
Short description: The aim of the event was to learn about culture, migration and identity in a new town. Milton Keynes is a New Town built in the 1970s to relieve housing pressure in London. Originally home to a largely homogenous population of skilled workers from the capital city, it has recently undergone a prominent ethnic shift: the BME population has doubled between 2001 and 2011, reaching 26%. The city is also growing rapidly, and is soon expected to reach 500,000 inhabitants. However, like many new towns, Milton Keynes is facing an identity problem. Despite strong grassroots cultural organizations, it suffers from a perceived lack of culture. How can the city’s thriving cultural scene be reflected in its image? And how can its growing cultural diversity be expressed in its identity?

Event 2 Participation: The event involved 209 citizens, including 4 participants from the city of Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), 182 participants from the city of Sabaudia and University of Padua (Italy), 3 participants from the city of Grand Paris Sud (France), 5 participants from the KTH University (Sweden), 8 participants from the city of Nissewaard and the International New Town Institute (the Netherlands) and 7 participants from the city of Aarhus and Aarhus School of Architecture (Denmark)
Location / Dates: The event took place in Sabaudia, Italy, from 16/05/2018 to 17/05/2018
Short description: The aim of the event was to learn about re-planning collective spaces to rediscover our roots. Sabaudia, conceived in the 1930’s with a polycentric vision, has been a land for immigrants since its origins: first, during Fascism, when populations from Veneto, Friuli, Trentino and Emilia Romagna moved to the region to work in agriculture; later (1980-2000) workers from Poland and Maghreb were employed. The most recent immigrant agricultural workers are the Punjabi, who are currently the largest ethnic minority (11% of the population of Sabaudia, according to City Council statistics 2017). Romanians and Moroccans are the second largest ethnic groups in the city. Due to its location, open public spaces have always played a strategic role in cohesion and integration processes with newcomers. The New Town Lab and design workshop with students from the University of Padua will engage citizens and professionals in the elaboration of visions, plans and strategies for the improvement of the existing collective spaces and the planning of new ones inside and outside the town with the aim of connecting and involving the diverse population of Sabaudia.

Event 3 Participation: The event involved 219 citizens, including 3 participants from the city of Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), 5 participants from the city of Sabaudia and University of Padua (Italy), 193 participants from the city of Grand Paris Sud (France), 5 participants from the KTH University (Sweden), 8 participants from the city of Nissewaard and the International New Town Institute (the Netherlands) and 5 participants from the city of Aarhus and Aarhus School of Architecture (Denmark)
Location / Dates: The event took place in Grand Paris Sud, France, from 17/10/2018 to 18/10/2018
Short description: The aim of the event was to learn about processes of citizenship of migrants in new towns. Grand Paris Sud (GPS) is an urban agglomeration created in 2016 by the merging of 24 municipalities some of which are New Towns founded in the years 1970s of the last century. These cities have responded to the challenge of welcoming tens of thousands of inhabitants from different places in the world by providing housing,transport and jobs. Nowadays, the population is extremely diverse in terms of ethnic origins and religious denominations. In the context of mass unemployment, coupled with the attacks in Paris, France is currently experiencing a disturbing identity crisis. The finger is often pointed at the melting pot of the suburbs; the migrants and their descendants are increasingly accused of causing the evils in French society. How to better understand the ongoing changes and value the potential offered by the migrant population in the development of contemporary urban culture?

Event 4 Participation: The event involved 76 citizens, including 3 participants from the city of Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), 5 participants from the city of Sabaudia and University of Padua (Italy), 5 participants from the city of Grand Paris Sud (France), 49 participants from the KTH University (Sweden), 9 participants from the city of Nissewaard and the International New Town Institute (the Netherlands) and 5 participants from the city of Aarhus and Aarhus School of Architecture (Denmark)
Location / Dates: The event took place in Vällingby, Sweden, from 12/12/2018 to 13/12/2018
Short description: The aim of the event was to learn about how a new town can adapt to present needs. Vällingby in Stockholm teamed up with the KTH School of Architecture for the organization of a lab that investigates the transformations of the post-war built environment and its social milieus over time – from the so-called ABC-town of work-dwelling-centre (arbete-bostad-centrum) of the 1950s, to a town with more diverse population and less workplaces in the 1980s, to a contemporary town characterized in part by international migration and with a revitalized centre. During the workshop, we will develop insights and formulate strategies with professionals, users, and residents to analyse how the former structures of the mid-20th century Swedish welfare state are being used today. We will also question how these structures and infrastructures can be transformed and adjusted for the future and for new organizations of everyday life, especially with respect to the area’s highly diverse residents.

Event 5 Participation: The event involved 153 citizens, including 5 participants from the city of Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), 3 participants from the city of Sabaudia and University of Padua (Italy), 5 participants from the city of Grand Paris Sud (France), 5 participants from the KTH University (Sweden), 129 participants from the city of Nissewaard and the International New Town Institute (the Netherlands) and 6 participants from the city of Aarhus and Aarhus School of Architecture (Denmark)
Location / Dates: The event took place in Nissewaard, the Netherlands, from 20/02/2019 to 22/02/2019
Short description: The aim of the event was learn about reshaping government-citizen relations. The resentment of populations throughout Europe towards their governments, politics and politicians has led to the misconception of the migrants being a reason for the breakdown between government citizens. How can we reshape the relationships between governments and citizens with migrants as a valued resource for our communities? The result of the lab will be ideas and initiatives realized by citizens with migrant and non-migrant backgrounds addressing the question: how can New Towns become places of participation and real influence for their inhabitants?

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